Gems by Name

Alexandrite-Chrysoberyl

Amber

Amethyst

Aquamarine

Chrysoberyl

Citrine

Coral

Diamond

Emerald

Garnet

Jade

Kunzite

Lapis Lazuli

Malachite

Opal

Pearl

Peridot

Ruby

Sapphire

Spinel

Tanzanite

Topaz

Tourmaline

Tsavorite-
Garnet


Turquoise

Zircon

 

Citrine

Citrine belongs to the quartz group which also includes amethyst, and smoky quartz. Most citrine is formed when amethyst is heated commercially. The color ranges from light yellow to dark yellow to reddish yellow. Natural, unheated citrine is rare. The term Madeira citrine refers to citrine which has a reddish-brown color caused from heating at high temperatures. Look for citrine that has no eye visible inclusions. Much of the citrine on the market today is color zoned; areas where the color is unevenly distributed. Usually this will not affect the face up appearance. A great deal of citrine is poorly faceted with deep pavilions, thus making it difficult to set in jewelry. People become of aware of this problem when they buy citrine while they are on vacation, somewhere like in Brazil and bring it back to their jeweler to set into jewelry. Many times the jewelry has to be hand made to accommodate the gem, increasing its price far beyond what was originally intended. Beware of poor cutting! It will cost you dearly.

The marketplace is awash in synthetic citrine and amethyst. It is important to deal with a reputable jeweler who will guarantee the gem's natural origin. Synthetic citrine can be suspected when all of the jewelry in a display case is set with calibrated, Madeira color citrine. Natural citrine in good color will sell for $30/ct for one to five carat sizes (example: 5 carats x $30/ct = $150.00). So if the price of the jewelry doesn't reflect this cost, be careful. You could be looking at synthetic material.

 

Brazil, Malagasy Republic, Colorado, Spain, Russia
SiO2, silicon dioxide; hexagonal (trigonal); hexagonal prisms with pyramids
Transparent; R.I. 1.54-1.55; Hardness 7
Widely available in sizes ranging from small to medium
Light yellow to gold-brown. Maderia citrine usually has some reddish brown to the color
Heating- stable
Normal (be careful of heating-can affect color)
None
Found in faceted and cabochon and freeform shapes
$30-$50/ct (one to fifteen carats)
Best prices paid for Maderia citrine (reddish brown and saturated color)

 

 

 

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